Posts Tagged ‘ document management ’

Email is not content management!

According to an infographic CCLoop published, sourcing information from Mashable, “The Social Break-Up” by ExactTarget, and Neilsen Research (to name a few) an estimated 2.8 Million emails are sent every second. That’s 90 Trillion emails each year, and email usage continues to grow in both Consumer and Business markets.


Infographic by: ccLoop

It also cites “Attachment Chaos” as first of the Top Four Email Annoyances, and I bet your inbox contains more content than it should. I bet there are files, reports, presentations and other critical documents that aren’t being formally managed (even if you are required to do so). I bet you don’t save attachments as they come in, and spend … no – WASTE your valuable time searching for attachments when you need them.

I say this with confidence, because last month Openera issued a poll asking “How do you Manage your Attachments?”. While it came as no surprise to us, almost 65% of those polled indicated they search for attachments later when they need them.

There is a lot of noise in your inbox, which can result in lost attachments, missed opportunities and other headaches. To be on top of your game, you need to properly manage all of your documents and be able to access them on the spot. So why is it we keep using our inbox as a content management system?

Are we too lazy to save attachments as they come in? Maybe. It’s more probable that we’re too busy to be spending too much time worrying about saving stuff where it’s supposed to go, when we think we can just look for it later when we need it.

Sure, there are a number of ways you can “manage” your content in your inbox(es): Creating and managing multiple folders, setting up custom search filters, or  being incredibly diligent in saving each and every attachment as you see it. No matter how you slice it though, each is very manual and time consuming.

Isn’t technology supposed to make your life easier? When it comes to your inbox, or inboxes, don’t you wish your stuff could just go where you want it to?

Exactly.

We know how frustrating it can be to keep track of all of your attachments across multiple inboxes. We also know how annoying (and unnecessary) it is when someone says “we have a solution for that – but you have to completely change the way you work in order to use it”. This is why SmartCloud automatically tags and saves your important attachments precisely where you want them to go … without changing the way you work.

How are YOU managing your email attachments today? Leave us a comment, let us know what tactics or services you’re using to keep your inbox clean, and attachments organized.

And of course, you can Go Here to learn more about SmartCloud

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Hacking a Cure for the Salesforce Email Headache

Today’s post comes to you from our very own, Adam Daw. Adam recently took the “hack-a-thon” crown at the International Startup Festival in Montreal. Here’s what Adam has to say about the hack-a-thon, the current state of email integration and Salesforce, and how many of the existing Salesforce email headaches can be solved with SmartCloud:

A couple of weeks ago, for the International Startup Festival in Montreal, a few companies related to Email threw an off-site event – a “hack-a-thon” – to announce their new APIs. I attended the event, and had a pretty good idea of a “neat” tool that I’d like to see for dealing with the kind of data you find in your email inbox. I was pretty jazzed up to start writing the tool until I found out two things:

  1. What we were being judged on
  2. Someone else had already built it at a similar event the month before

We were being judged on the number of APIs from that day we used, the creativity of our app, but also the financial viability of it. The business sense. So instead of doing something “cool”, I decided to do something that as a Salesforce User and Admin/Developer, I knew was a particular sore point with the application – Email Integration.

The current state of affairs for integration between email and Salesforce is a bit of a hodgepodge of solutions, so to speak. You can integrate Salesforce with your Outlook installation, or set up an email service (or use the existing Google service for this) that you then make privy to all of your email traffic, bcc’ing it every time you want something to show up in salesforce. You also have to be aware that one solution doesn’t act the same as the other – they all have their quirks and idiosyncrasies, so if you have users on multiple platforms or some that prefer Outlook and others that don’t, there’s no unified truth for email in Salesforce. Of course, you can force users to adopt one method or another, but then you’re making your users conform to the tool instead of making the tool fit the user – not exactly the goal when implementing a system as robust as Salesforce.com!

Once the email data is in Salesforce, it works “sort of” like any other object, but not really. It’s hard to get the data you want when you need it, and even harder to make sense of the data once you find it – assuming your users are still uploading data the way they’re supposed to. With the burden of data delivery on your salespeople, you’re taking them away from the key tasks they’re meant to perform and asking them to follow a new process every time they do something as naturally reflexive as send out an email. That’s like asking someone to change the way they breathe, all day and every day: it can be done, and it’s not an incredibly difficult task, but you’ll be hard pressed to get as much done in your day as you potentially could! Also, you’re more than likely to forget as soon as something important comes up and shakes you out of it. In other words, it’s not natural, it’s not needed, and it’s not the best use of your time!

I guess that’s the ultimate goal when I started working on this – the autonomic nervous system of the sales cycle. Just like youshouldn’t constantly have to think about when to breathe and how, your salespeople shouldn’t have to think about how their email data is getting into Salesforce. By connecting to the email server directly, we can make sure the key data needed to let you make the right decisions ends up in the right location, and by making the details configurable from directly inside Salesforce, we can do it without requiring any additional components or systems to be set up. No plugins in your email client, no bcc’ing some random email address with every communication, and it can all be done directly from inside your Salesforce window. So that’s what I presented, or at least the beginning of it, at the hack-a-thon.

Apparently I wasn’t alone with my frustrations, as I ended up winning the event.

My own cloud history (Part 1)

This is a partial re-post of a rather verbose post from last year. I’ve been thinking a lot about my own personal cloud history lately and this story is worth sharing again.

The Birth of Document Management | Interleaf was known for their technical publishing software (Interleaf 5 and 6 at the time) that ran on Unix and later PC. Because the documents our clients were creating were quite complex, we needed to provide them with ways to manage the documents and the Document Management industry was born. (It was a relational document management system sitting on an Oracle database, they called it RDM…very creative!) This was a fundamental that Interleaf got right. They listened to their customers and filled a need they were willing to pay for.
There was a real excitement over the future of document management and one of the most exciting times came when a developer web enabled RDM and our viewer technology called WorldView. (Way better than Adobe Acrobat at the time but Adobe decided to give away their viewer for free… well played Adobe. Well played.) This was in the heyday of Netscape and we called this web enabled viewer of business documents “Business Web”.
We went after our base and began selling. It was early, bleeding edge, but still garnered purchase orders. I began packaging services with the license and branded it the Business Web Starter Kit to get early adopters. It worked and at $50K a deal, we started doing quite well. Not mainstream success, but validated a need. I got more creative because I had to hit my quota. Working with GE Capital, I started offering customers a way to lease the licenses and roll in the services over 3 years. This approach brought PO’s from a few key accounts that had stalled. Then as objections arose around implementation, we began hosting business webs for clients who paid an annual license fee plus ‘maintenance’. We were able to secure a few clients before the wheels began to fall off at Interleaf and RDM was re-branded Quicksilver and the company sold to Broadvision.
Looking back on that time in the late nineties, I realize that it we had created a business model that made sense, but the technology was too bleeding edge at the time, and not mature enough to succeed. Most companies in the document/content management space eventually went to a hosted or ASP model by the mid 2000’s and Salesforce.com and Amazon matured the business model while addressing the security, performance and support aspects that made software-as-a-service (SaaS) mainstream and branded as “the cloud.” The technology was great, but it was the business model that made the biggest difference. We focused on the fundamentals and listened to our clients. They wanted to try bleeding edge technology to prove concepts and move the business further faster (one of our tag lines) but had limited capital budgets. By changing the business model, we tapped into operating expense budgets and reduced the friction of the sale.